PRIDE Atheist Bookworm No Hate
The Nautilus Tattoo
beedomi:

Sister Sarah taking a trip to Cosima’s school to deal with them arseholes 

beedomi:

Sister Sarah taking a trip to Cosima’s school to deal with them arseholes 

a-nice-little-cigarette:

unnamedpets:

same ebro

I relate on an intimately spiritual level

a-nice-little-cigarette:

unnamedpets:

same ebro

I relate on an intimately spiritual level

First of all, I wanted to thank you. Before I started watching [Orphan Black], I was really in the closet and I was totally ashamed of who I was. I hated myself. I started watching the show and seeing [openly lesbian character] Cosima and seeing everything is not about her sexuality and that she is more than her sexuality. My parents weren’t okay with me being gay. I started watching the show with my mom and it’s helped us start to rebuild our relationship.

[My mother] sees Cosima and she sees that it’s okay and that people are more than their sexuality. I want to thank you for that. … What’s it like to have that effect on peoples’ lives and know you’re changing peoples’ lives and making people more comfortable with who they are? You’re saving lives. That’s what you did for me. So, I just wanted to know what’s that like?
- This single question brought Tatiana Maslany to tears at Comic Con. Watch her response. (via micdotcom)

tatsrathat:

anytime i watch 2x01 i’m always like OH! RIGHT! helena was “dead”


cloneinstitute:

Prayer circle that we get an orphanblack blooper reel tonight at the panel.

image


racebending:

For the first time ever, this year’s Women Who Kick Ass panel at ComicCon was held in the convention’s largest venue, Hall H.  Entertainment Weekly covers the panel here and it sounds incredible.   A full transcript of the panel is here.
Unfortunately, the audience’s response to this panel was sexist and predictable.

A panel called “Women Who Kick Ass” follows Hunger Games. It’s in its fourth iteration, and the fact that it’s in Hall H on Saturday is a surprise. On the surface, it makes sense for this to follow Hunger Games, and it’s also likely the Con intended it to be something that would allow for the room to clear out a bit while shuffling in more people from the line that still snakes off across the street outside. But, all the same, there’s something gutsy about placing a frank discussion of Hollywood sexism, feminism, and the limited opportunities for women in the entertainment industry right before 20th Century Fox and Marvel come out to present superhero-heavy slates.
And “Women Who Kick Ass” is the most fascinating and enriching panel I attend at Comic-Con. In particular, its discussion of how sexism still rules far too often in Hollywood is terrific, with panelist Katee Sackhoff (of Battlestar Galactica fame) discussing a time an unnamed male actor pulled her arms out of their sockets while filming a fight sequence, in what she believes was recourse for her questioning him earlier in the shoot; and fellow panelist Tatiana Maslany of Orphan Black discussing how a male crew member inappropriately hit on her when she was just 18 and bound to a bed for a shot. The moderator is good, in that she knows to get out of the way when the women on the panel — particularly Michelle Rodriguez — cut loose, and the content is engaging throughout.
For the most part, the dudes I’m sitting near either pay respectful attention or check Twitter, though there are some jokes from an older guy in front of me about how stupid he finds all of this. Then Rodriguez uses the phrase “destructive male culture” — as part of a larger answer about how women need to take more agency in telling their own stories — and something in the crowd flips. A certain subset of the audience begins to get more and more vocal, and when the panel runs slightly over, as all panels have done during the day, the vocalizations begin to get easier to hear, even to someone sitting clear across a giant room in a place that tends to eat sound from specific individuals in the audience; one really has to make a ruckus to be heard.
The final question — from a young woman about what aspects the perfect kick-ass woman would have — turns into a digression about the many roles that women play in real life and the few that they are asked to play onscreen. It’s all fascinating stuff, with Sackhoff talking about wanting to see someone as kind and strong as her mother onscreen, and Walking Dead’s Danai Gurira talking about the effectiveness of female political protestors in her native Zimbabwe, the sort of story that would almost never appear in a Hollywood film — but the longer it goes on, the more restless the crowd gets. When Rodriguez grabs the microphone again to follow up on a point made by another panelist, for the first time, the audience ripples with something close to jeering anger. When the panel finally ends and the five women on it proceed off to the side for photographs, something done at the end of most Hall H panels, someone shouts something from the audience, to a mixture of supportive laughs and horrified gasps, and the women quickly leave the stage. (I was not sitting close enough to hear what was said, but I confirmed with several people sitting in the immediate vicinity that it was a young man shouting “Women who talk too much!” after the loudspeaker asked attendees to voice their appreciation for the participants in the “Women Who Kick Ass” panel.)
It’s an ugly moment, an unfortunate capper to a great session, to be followed by many of the guys sitting around me offering up tired lines like “I hope they feel empowered now!” and several recitations of the Twilight mantra about ruining the Con. To be sure, most people in the room were respectful. But at a certain point, there needs to be an accounting for the fact that there is an ugliness that burbles beneath the surface of too many Comic-Con events, sometimes intentional and sometimes unintentional. That’s not a task for the Con itself. It’s a task for nerd culture, and one that will require an earnest attempt to understand why this sort of ugliness rises up so often around women, lest all the nerd culture stereotypes prove unfortunately true.
-Todd VanDerWerff “A Day Inside ComicCon’s Hall H”

racebending:

For the first time ever, this year’s Women Who Kick Ass panel at ComicCon was held in the convention’s largest venue, Hall H.  Entertainment Weekly covers the panel here and it sounds incredible.   A full transcript of the panel is here.

Unfortunately, the audience’s response to this panel was sexist and predictable.

A panel called “Women Who Kick Ass” follows Hunger Games. It’s in its fourth iteration, and the fact that it’s in Hall H on Saturday is a surprise. On the surface, it makes sense for this to follow Hunger Games, and it’s also likely the Con intended it to be something that would allow for the room to clear out a bit while shuffling in more people from the line that still snakes off across the street outside. But, all the same, there’s something gutsy about placing a frank discussion of Hollywood sexism, feminism, and the limited opportunities for women in the entertainment industry right before 20th Century Fox and Marvel come out to present superhero-heavy slates.

And “Women Who Kick Ass” is the most fascinating and enriching panel I attend at Comic-Con. In particular, its discussion of how sexism still rules far too often in Hollywood is terrific, with panelist Katee Sackhoff (of Battlestar Galactica fame) discussing a time an unnamed male actor pulled her arms out of their sockets while filming a fight sequence, in what she believes was recourse for her questioning him earlier in the shoot; and fellow panelist Tatiana Maslany of Orphan Black discussing how a male crew member inappropriately hit on her when she was just 18 and bound to a bed for a shot. The moderator is good, in that she knows to get out of the way when the women on the panel — particularly Michelle Rodriguez — cut loose, and the content is engaging throughout.

For the most part, the dudes I’m sitting near either pay respectful attention or check Twitter, though there are some jokes from an older guy in front of me about how stupid he finds all of this. Then Rodriguez uses the phrase “destructive male culture” — as part of a larger answer about how women need to take more agency in telling their own stories — and something in the crowd flips. A certain subset of the audience begins to get more and more vocal, and when the panel runs slightly over, as all panels have done during the day, the vocalizations begin to get easier to hear, even to someone sitting clear across a giant room in a place that tends to eat sound from specific individuals in the audience; one really has to make a ruckus to be heard.

The final question — from a young woman about what aspects the perfect kick-ass woman would have — turns into a digression about the many roles that women play in real life and the few that they are asked to play onscreen. It’s all fascinating stuff, with Sackhoff talking about wanting to see someone as kind and strong as her mother onscreen, and Walking Dead’s Danai Gurira talking about the effectiveness of female political protestors in her native Zimbabwe, the sort of story that would almost never appear in a Hollywood film — but the longer it goes on, the more restless the crowd gets. When Rodriguez grabs the microphone again to follow up on a point made by another panelist, for the first time, the audience ripples with something close to jeering anger. When the panel finally ends and the five women on it proceed off to the side for photographs, something done at the end of most Hall H panels, someone shouts something from the audience, to a mixture of supportive laughs and horrified gasps, and the women quickly leave the stage. (I was not sitting close enough to hear what was said, but I confirmed with several people sitting in the immediate vicinity that it was a young man shouting “Women who talk too much!” after the loudspeaker asked attendees to voice their appreciation for the participants in the “Women Who Kick Ass” panel.)

It’s an ugly moment, an unfortunate capper to a great session, to be followed by many of the guys sitting around me offering up tired lines like “I hope they feel empowered now!” and several recitations of the Twilight mantra about ruining the Con. To be sure, most people in the room were respectful. But at a certain point, there needs to be an accounting for the fact that there is an ugliness that burbles beneath the surface of too many Comic-Con events, sometimes intentional and sometimes unintentional. That’s not a task for the Con itself. It’s a task for nerd culture, and one that will require an earnest attempt to understand why this sort of ugliness rises up so often around women, lest all the nerd culture stereotypes prove unfortunately true.

-Todd VanDerWerff “A Day Inside ComicCon’s Hall H”

I just think that we’re at a point where television is extremely exciting. I just feel really lucky to be at this point in television history making a show like this, and in the company of shows like that. The Emmys is lovely and wonderful, but to me it’s more about hearing the response from the fans… Being in this room — that’s why we do it.
- Tatiana Maslany on her Emmy Snub, at SDCC 2014 (via cosimathedork)

vivacosima:

i’m just so crestfallen about the fact that evelyne can’t be there, i have no words


i-effed-it-all-up:

everyone in clone club has their own favorite characters, but i think one thing we can all agree on is that scott is incredible and deserves the nickname great scott 100%


Yipee! My first 100 followers

Bonjour a tous!


"At some point," he says, "there is a definite chance that we may see that." Manson suggests there’s a "twist" to Beth’s story that he looks forward to showing.
- A TWIST. TO BETH’S STORY.  (via vivacosima)

Nothing is off the table. At some point, there is a definite chance that we may see that. There’s a "twist" to Beth’s story that we look forward showing it.
- OB creators (Will we ever see a Beth flashback?)

(Source: 324b21-clone)


shutupaubrey:

if you’re a boy and you cry it is not dumb and you are not a pussy you’re a fucking human being


thedelicatedaffodil:

I often look around my classrooms and think “well SOMEONE has to be gay in here, statistically!”

Then I realize that it’s me.


billykaploser:

tumblr is currently a place for people not at comic-con to sit and wait for pictures of comic-con to be posted. then cry about how we are not at comic-con.